German Noun ‘Freund’: Gender, Plural, & Case [Explained]

The gender of ‘Freund’ in German is masculine: der Freund (the friend). Its plural is ‘die Freunde’ (the friends).

‘Freund’ is a common German noun that you’ll use to communicate in everyday spoken & written German. But using ‘Freund’ requires understanding The German Case System.

German Noun ‘Fenster’: Gender, Plural, & Case [Explained]

The gender of ‘Fenster’ in German is neuter: das Fenster (the window). Its plural is ‘die Fenster’ (the windows).

‘Fenster’ is a common German noun that you’ll use to communicate in everyday spoken & written German. But using ‘Fenster’ requires understanding The German Case System.

German Noun ‘Familie’: Gender, Plural, & Case [Explained]

The gender of ‘Familie’ in German is feminine: die Familie (the family). Its plural is ‘die Familien’ (the families).

‘Familie’ is a common German noun that you’ll use to communicate in everyday spoken & written German. But using ‘Familie’ requires understanding The German Case System.

German Noun ‘Computer’: Gender, Plural, & Case [Explained]

The gender of ‘Computer’ in German is masculine: der Computer (the computer). Its plural is ‘die Computer’ (the computers).

‘Computer’ is a common German noun that you’ll use to communicate in everyday spoken & written German. But using ‘Computer’ requires understanding The German Case System.

German Noun ‘Buch’: Gender, Plural, & Case [Explained]

The gender of ‘Buch’ in German is neuter: das Buch (the book). Its plural is ‘die Bücher’ (the books).

‘Buch’ is a common German noun that you’ll use to communicate in everyday spoken & written German. But using ‘Buch’ requires understanding The German Case System.

German Noun ‘Brot’: Gender, Plural, & Case [Explained]

The gender of ‘Brot’ in German is neuter: das Brot (the bread). Its plural is ‘die Brote (the breads).

‘Brot’ is a common German noun that you’ll use to communicate in everyday spoken & written German. But using ‘Brot’ requires understanding The German Case System.

German Noun ‘Film’: Gender, Plural, & Case [Explained]

The gender of ‘Film’ in German is masculine: der Film (the movie). Its plural is ‘die Filme’ (the movies).

‘Film’ is a common German noun that you’ll use to communicate in everyday spoken & written German. But using ‘Film’ requires understanding The German Case System.

German Noun ‘Auto’: Gender, Plural, & Case [Explained]

The gender of ‘Auto’ in German is neuter: das Auto (the car). Its plural is ‘die Autos’ (the cars).

‘Auto’ is a common German noun that you’ll use to communicate in everyday spoken & written German. But using ‘Auto’ requires understanding The German Case System.

How you tell if a German word (i.e. specifically a noun) is masculine or feminine (or a 3rd option: neuter) is a matter of recognizing various noun endings and noun groups that are associated with one gender over the other two.

Rather than attempting to memorize a seemingly random der, die, or das paired with each German noun (there are thousands!!), memorizing a much much shorter list of noun endings and noun groups will be more effective and infinitely less frustrating.

Distinguishing the nominative from accusative cases in German is a matter of three possibilities:

  1. declensions
  2. semantics
  3. word order